Thursday, May 20, 2010

Agenda for May 24, Dunwoody City Council Meeting

Monday, May 24th
Dunwoody City Hall
41 Perimeter Center East
Dunwoody, GA 30346
7:00 p.m. - Watch Live

Work Session Agenda
at 6 pm
Voting Meeting Agenda at 7 pm

Administration of Oath of Office to Council Member-Elect Doug Thompson.
Administration of Oath of Office to Officer Chris Forman.

Public Hearing: for the codification of Chapter 21, Signs, and Chapter 27, Zoning, of the City of Dunwoody Code of Ordinances.

SECOND READ – Ordinance to adopt City of Dunwoody Code of Ordinances.

SECOND READ – Ordinance to amend Chapter 21, Signs, and Chapter 27, Zoning, Article III, Overlay District Regulations, §3C-13, Regulations.
Public Hearing: Amendment of Zoning Classification of 121 Perimeter Center Parkway (RZ 10-041) from OI to OCR.

SECOND READ – Ordinance to amend the Zoning Classification of 121 Perimeter Center Parkway (RZ 10-041) from OI to OCR.

Public Hearing: Authorization of a Special Land Use Permit at 121 Perimeter Center Parkway (SLUP 10-041) to exceed two-story height limit to allow for existing three-story office building.

SECOND READ – Ordinance to authorize a Special Land Use Permit to 121 Perimeter Center Parkway (SLUP 10-041) to exceed two-story height limit to allow for existing three-story office building.

SECOND READ – Ordinance to amend Chapter 16 Offenses and Violations re: Noise.

Brook Run Conservancy overview by Bill McCahan.

Art Festival Update.

Public Hearing - City of Dunwoody 2030 Comprehensive Plan.
Public Hearing & First Read - Ordinance to adopt the proposed 2010 Millage Rate.

Resolution to appoint members to the Sustainability Commission (Sean Doughtie, Anne Hicks, Elizabeth Hudson).

Contract with Atlanta Regional Commission for Livable Centers Initiative grant for Dunwoody Village.

Executive Session - for the purposes of legal, real estate, and personnel discussions.

2 comments:

John Heneghan said...

Attached in the link below are my suggested comments to the Dunwoody Comprehensive Plan to lessen emphasis on the 2005 LCI plan for Perimeter Center.

2030_Comprehensive_Plan_w_Heneghan_edits.pdf

Bob said...

Your conservative approach and fear of the LCI is somewhat misplaced.
While an additional 5000 apartments will be opposed by everyone, we must make sure that Perimeter is allowed to grow as it will be our only way to grow the revenue within Dunwoody.
I hope that there is a full and open debate over each of the council suggested changes as well as your new comments.
Please make sure that each point is open to PUBLIC discussion.
I suggest that each red line and your blue line be read and then each item be open for public comment.
I have a couple of general questions that perhaps you can answer of have the staff answer on Monday:

1. The suggested amendments call for increasing heights or density when the proposed development is "exceptional". I question whether or not that is a bit arbitrary, hence ripe for a lawsuit and legal challenge. What you view as exceptional, may not be what I see or a developer deems exceptional.
2. Another is the continued use of "appropriate amenities” How do we define that?
3. Can the city legal deny development or redevelopment using school capacity as a criterion?
4. Why would the city, in its comp plan, set a policy of NOT supporting a public recreation facility. NOT everyone in the city can afford to pay dues to the Dunwoody Country Club or live in a neighborhood with a swim and tennis club. While this council may not support such facilities, the Comp Plan should not be written to restrict future councils from doing so.
5. As much as we want, we cannot regulate what happens at Perimeter College. Why then the do we include the wasted attention to a "policy” that states unenforceable limits (pg32).
6. The reduction of the densities of multifamily housing to 24 units per acre is a recipe for urban decline. The effect will be similar to "rent control" in major cities. Limit an owner’s opportunity make money, the less they spend in maintaining properties. Out dated apartments, less rent. The downward spiral begins. The proverbial "slippery slope"
I fear sometimes that the City Council forgets that this is no longer a "homeowners association”. When we became a city, we took on the issues of all the residents and businesses, not just the homeowners. The City Council must now lead and govern for all of Dunwoody and that means for homeowners, businesses, developers, and apartment dwellers.
If you do not, you run the risk of becoming what the critics of the cityhood movement said we would become a city of exclusion.
“We have ours, so let pull up the drawbridge and fill up the moat.”